mosaic nashville
CONTENTS

What Dan Said to the Guy in the T-Shirt
by: Dan Kimball

A Learned to Learner Litany of Transformation?
by: Leonard Sweet

Preaching to the Postmodern Choir by Eutychus Bailey
by: by Eutychus Bailey

I 'sinned' to see Billy Graham
by: By Dan Kimball

Two questions unbelievers often ask about the resurrection
by: Lee Strobel

24 Transtions for moving into the 21st Century
by: by Leonard Sweet

The Relationship Driven Church (Warning: This Is Not A Program)
by: John 0'Keefe

The Bible for Missing People
by: By Neil Tibbot

God, a friend, and a good cup of coffee
by: Gary Morgan

How do you see the emerging/postmodern conversation?
by: Mark Tabb

Ministry of Presence
by: Jared R. Mackey

The Missional Church
by: TIm Keller

SE7EN QUESTIONS
by: Dan Kimball

The Church
by: Andrea Johnston

who is Jesus?
by: John O'Keefe

 

 

This section will include posts from the mosaic community and others who have thoughts on all sorts of things.

 

NEWS

August 15, 2006
new sunday conversation a·wak·en·ing
a·wak·en·ing is about people who sense God's calling on their lives, it?s about a community with dreams, it?s about a community exploring what God might want to do in and through them, it?s about rearrangement, it?s about stretching, it?s about beginning for some and growing for others. Join us over the next few months as we explore the movement of God as told in the book of Acts. Join us as Mosaic continues to open ourselves up to God and allows God to shape and change us. Join us as we experience an ACT of?a·wak·en·ing

May 23, 2006
Mosaic Sabbatical Week
Sabbaticals in today's world refer to an extended time completely away from one's normal work.
Sabbatical comes from the word Sabbath. If we look at the Biblical roots of the Sabbath, we see that it means the day of rest. But the intention was to not only rest the body and the mind, but also to refresh our souls.
Beginning May 28th after our morning worship gathering until June 4 we will have no schedule events, in hopes to rest the body, the mind, and the soul.
So prepare yourself and determine what you need to shift your thinking from the normal schedule to sabbatical. Without this mindset rearrangement, it will be difficult to achieve the goals that you've set. Take the time to get your mind and our soul ready.
And may your sabbatical week be a time of refreshment for your mind, your body and your soul. Enjoy the week and we will see you next Sunday.

Thoughts and ideas- from Your Vacation as a True Sabbatical by Jeff Cornwall Director of the Belmont University Center for Entrepreneurship Bio/Vita

March 13, 2006
threads the conversation
threads: the values from the ancient scriptures that are at the core of God's story and at the core of who Mosaic desires to be as a community of Jesus followers.
these are the essentials that are woven into all we are and all we are becoming ? both as individuals and as a whole. They shape us as followers of Jesus, defining our role in the movement of God. This is who we are. These are non-negotiables that we hold to, that we strive for. They become the rhythms that we live by.
Mission. Love. Design. Relevance. Surrender.
So, join us over the next few weeks as we explore, experience, and engage in the conversation, threads.

January 12, 2006
Community Groups Begin (check out the schedule and Join one)

Mosaic will be a church of "people", not a "place" you go to. For us, the point is not just "going to a church," but being church in our daily lives and everyday interactions with others. At mosaic, commonLIFE in Christ starts @ home and among friends.

Thus community groups gather in homes, but also in other kinds of spaces. Some groups meet in coffeehouses and some in parks. The spaces vary, but the purpose is the same: small groups of people gathering to share life, tell stories, eat meals, pray, serve and grow together in Jesus Christ.

So, join a community group and invest in others.

January 3, 2006
New Sunday Conversation "30 Days"

Morgan Spurlock, creator of the documentary, ?Super Size Me? and the Fx original series, ?30 Days?, makes this statement about his television series, ?My goal with this series is just to plant the seeds that will hopefully inspire you to seek out more information or act to make a change in your own community. So get involved, make a difference, change the world ... in the end it's up to you.?
Over the next 30 days we long to do the same, to dive into conversations about the stories of those in scripture who have placed themselves into the shoes of others, the cultures of others, the lands of others and the lives of others. Our hope is that we may be convinced to act, to seek out, to get involved, to make a change, to follow in the ways of Jesus.
So for the next 30 days join us as we live in someone else?s shoes?.In the end it?s up to you.

December 22, 2005
Christmas Worship Gathering
December 23 Christmas Worship Gathering O' Come let us adore Him Friday 7:00 PM at the Anchor 629 Third Ave South 37210 Nashville, TN This year we'll celebrate Christmas with Carols, lots of Candles and Communion.

November 10, 2005
the ride continues
the ride continues,
the word is out,
yes, we are moving.
on december 4, 2005 to
629 third avenue south in downtown n?ville

On Sunday, December 4 we will be gathering at a new location, 629 Third Avenue South in Downtown Nashville. This location is the gathering place of The Anchor Fellowship http://theanchorfellowship.com.
The Anchor Fellowship Church has graciously allowed us to lease their facilities for Sunday gatherings, a few additional community gatherings a month, storage, and band practice. We continually thank the Lord and the Anchor fFllowship for paving the way for this new location.

So, pass the word and stay tuned for more information, and continue to do life with God and others.

November 7, 2005
The Building at McGavock
It was just a few months ago when we stated we will be moving into a new location at 1525 McGavock St. for our worship gathering. We were excited and felt it was where we needed to be for the time being. However, it is time to move again, we received a notice along with other the tenants of the building stating the building must be vacated by December 31, 2005. We are not exactly sure what is gong to happen to the building but we believe it is going to become a parking lot.
So, we are on the search again, for a venue in which we can gather together, eat meals together, and do life together.
Please be in pray for a new place to do life together. We have always stated that Church is a people not a place?may our actions continue to represent our words. Pass the word and stay tuned for more information about when a move will take place.
In the mean time the people of mosaic still do life all over including a building at 1525 McGavock st. ?. See you there.

September 25, 2005
Our role in foster care
Family Matters "Potluck and special speaker Sunday, September 25th after the service" MeLisa Hovind a foster parent will share from her experience (she became a foster parent at 21 and would've started earlier but that was the age minimum), and then Sharon Zinzow will discuss the ways we can be involved in helping out foster care. We will address service projects and a future meeting date. So come to listen and eat as we discover how God could utilize the community of Mosaic within the foster care system. For more information contact Sharon at Sharon.Zinzow@state.tn.us

September 13, 2005
THE RECEPTION WEEKEND
The Reception: Saturday - September 17
7:00pm
A party to celebrate the coming together of our community
At The Virtual Factory Stage & The Garage
1525 McGavock Street Nashville, TN 37203
Live music- food -Childcare will be provided

Picnic In the Park: Sunday - September 18
11:00am
This is our weekend gathering
We will gather at Centennial Park to wrap up the reception weekend. Bring your lunch, a blanket and a Frisbee and we will provide the drinks

For more information please see www.mosaicnashville.org or call 473-6485.

July 22, 2005
The Merge
It is here, merge week and It is going to be great!
The dates of July 26th picnic in the park & July 31st, our merge Sunday are fast approaching. I am excited about the God given opportunity to do life together. I continue to be blown away by the beautiful fit of vision and values from each community of faith. Thanks to all, for the conversations, questions and prayers, GOD IS GOOD. Let our days ahead be a time for our community to being formed into the image of Christ for the sake of others.

July 26 Picnic at the Park
July 31 Merge Sunday

June 23, 2005
NEW LOCATION
SUNDAY June 26 we will be moving into a new location for our worship gathering located at 1525 McGavock St.
This is not a permanent location as of yet, but it will be our home for the next phase of our life.
Pass the word and stay tuned for more information.

June 13, 2005
**Merge Ahead**
Dear Mosaic Community,
The decision has been made and the news is out, Mosaic is about to experience a blessed expansion! Mosaic Nashville and Mosaic are coming together to further our shared mission and vision. Thanks to all for the conversations, prayers and questions, it is great doing life together Gary



Mosaic Sabbatical Week:
Sabbaticals in today's world refer to an extended time completely away from one's normal work.
Sabbatical comes from the word Sabbath. If we look at the Biblical roots of the Sabbath, we see that it means the day of rest. But the intention was to not only rest the body and the mind, but also to refresh our souls.
Beginning May 28th after our morning worship gathering until June 4 we will have no schedule events, in hopes to rest the body, the mind, and the soul.
So prepare yourself and determine what you need to shift your thinking from the normal schedule to sabbatical. Without this mindset rearrangement, it will be difficult to achieve the goals that you've set. Take the time to get your mind and our soul ready.
And may your sabbatical week be a time of refreshment for your mind, your body and your soul. Enjoy the week and we will see you next Sunday.
Thoughts and ideas from Your Vacation as a True Sabbatical Jeff Cornwall Director of the Belmont University Center for Entrepreneurship Bio/Vita

 

 

THOUGHTS

Two questions unbelievers often ask about the resurrection
Lee Strobel

March 08, 2005

Aren't the Gospels really just a combination of myth and wishful thinking?

I used to believe that the historical documents that comprise the New Testament and describe the resurrection were irreparably flawed because they had been written so long -- perhaps 100 years -- after the events. As a professor told me in college, legend and wishful thinking developed during this interim period and hopelessly distorted the record of who Jesus was and what he did.

But as a journalist I found that many scholars are concluding there never was such a big gap between the life of Jesus and the belief that he's the resurrected Son of God. The key to this is establishing an accurate date for when the Book of Acts was written and then to work backwards to figure out when the resurrection accounts were recorded.

Jesus was crucified in 30 or 33 A.D. In his book Scaling the Secular City (Baker Academic, 1987), scholar J.P. Moreland cites half a dozen compelling reasons to conclude that the Book of Acts, which is the story of the early church, was written before the early 60s A.D.

For instance, the three main figures in Acts -- Peter, Paul, and James -- were all put to death between 61 and 65 A.D., but there's no mention of that in Acts, which gives many other details of their lives. And Acts doesn't discuss Emperor Nero's persecution of the church in the mid-60s or the war between the Jews and Romans, which broke out in 66 A.D. Surely all of this would have been included if Acts had been written after these events, so it must have been written before them.

We already know Acts was authored by the historian Luke, and that it's the second of a two-part work. The first part is the Gospel of Luke, which affirms Jesus as the resurrected Son of God, and so we know that it was written earlier than Acts.

And most historians agree that Mark's Gospel -- also testifying that Jesus is the resurrected Son of God -- was written before Luke because Luke apparently incorporated some of Mark's material into his own. Consequently, Mark's account is even closer to the events of Jesus' life. In fact, there's evidence that a key source that Mark included when writing about the empty tomb can be dated no later than 37 A.D.

Now the gap has been narrowed so much that there's nowhere near enough time for legend to have corrupted the historical record. Oxford University's renowned scholar of ancient Roman and Greek history, A.N. Sherwin-White, concluded that even the passage of two generations wouldn't be enough time for legend to wipe out a solid core of historical facts.

What's more, there's a creed of the early church that the Apostle Paul includes in 1 Corinthians 15:3-4which confirms that Jesus was put to death for our sins, was buried, and rose again on the third day, as was predicted in Scripture. Based on a variety of factors, some scholars date this creed to as early as 24 to 36 months after the crucifixion -- and the eyewitness accounts that underlie it go right back to the cross itself. In historical terms, this is like a hot news flash!

When Paul mentioned in1 Corinthians 15:6 that the resurrected Jesus appeared to 500 people at once, he specifically stated that many of them were still alive at the time he was writing. In effect, he was saying, "Hey, this happened so recently that these witnesses are still around -- ask them yourself if you don't believe me, and they'll tell you it's true!"

That's how assured he was, just as we can have confidence in the reliability of the biblical accounts of the resurrection.

Weren't the eyewitnesses to Christ's resurrection just hallucinating?

Not only was Jesus' tomb empty, but over a period of 40 days he appeared alive a dozen different times to more than 515 individuals -- to men and women, to believers and doubters, to tough-minded people and tender-hearted souls, to groups, to individuals, sometimes indoors, and sometimes outdoors in broad daylight.

He talked with people, he ate with them, he even invited one skeptic to put his finger into the nail holes in his hands and to put his hand into the spear wound in his side in order to verify that it was really him. This experience was so life-changing that the disciple Thomas ended up proclaiming to his violent death in south India that Jesus had, in fact, been resurrected.

I've covered scores of criminal trials as a legal affairs journalist, and I've never seen one with anywhere near 515 eyewitnesses. To put this into perspective, if you were to call each one of them to the stand to be questioned and cross-examined for just 15 minutes each, and you went around the clock without a break, it would take you from breakfast on Monday until dinner on Friday to hear them all. After listening to nearly 129 straight hours of eyewitness testimony, who could possibly walk away unconvinced?

Of course, as a skeptic I tried to poke holes in their stories. For instance, could these appearances have been hallucinations? Dr. Gary Collins -- president of a national association of psychologists, a university professor of psychology for 20 years, and the author of more than 40 books on psychology-related subjects -- says this just isn't possible.

Hallucinations, he said, are like dreams -- they're individual events that can't be shared between people. One expert said that 500 people sharing the same hallucination would be a bigger miracle than the resurrection itself!

But I wasn't ready to give up yet. If these weren't hallucinations, perhaps they were an example of what psychologists call "group think" -- a kind of wishful thinking where people in a group subtly encourage one another through the power of suggestion to see something that's not there.

But Collins said this wouldn't be possible either because the circumstances were completely wrong. The disciples weren't anticipating a resurrection, which would have been totally alien to their Jewish beliefs, so they weren't primed for this sort of "group think" to occur. In addition, Jesus ate with them, talked back and forth with them, and appeared numerous times before all kinds of people in different emotional states -- all of which runs contrary to the "group think" theory.

Besides, what about the empty tomb? If the eyewitnesses had merely talked themselves into imagining a vision of Jesus, then His body would still have been in the tomb -- and surely the Romans would have produced it.

The verdict of history

Since every shred of historical documentation for Jesus rising from the dead is evidence for our own eventual resurrection, then we can face the future with confident expectancy. The hope that Christians will overcome the grave and spend eternity with God is not the desperate longing of people too afraid to face their own mortality. Instead, it's a rational and logical conclusion based on the compelling testimony of history.

"No intelligent jury in the world," said Lord Darling, the brilliant Chief Justice of England, "could fail to bring in a verdict that the resurrection story is true."

And we can proceed with bold assurance, thanks to the evidence of history that establishes with convincing clarity how Jesus not only preceded us in death but also came back from the dead and blazed the trail to heaven."But these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God. Then, by believing, you may have life through his name." (John 20:31, NCV)

-Purpose-Driven®-

This article is based on a chapter from Lee Strobel's book God's Outrageous Claims (Zondervan, 1998).

Written by Lee Strobel on Wednesday, April 6, 2005, 05:14 PM.
Last modified on Friday, July 15, 2005, 12:17 PM.

 

 

Mosaic P. O. BOX 60604 Nashville, TN, 37206 :: 615-473-6485 www.mosaicnashville.org